Corporate Defense and Disputes

Important developments in U.S. securities law, white collar criminal defense, regulatory enforcement and other emerging issues impacting financial services institutions, publicly traded companies and private investment funds

Tanya Dmitronow

Subscribe to all posts by Tanya Dmitronow

Demand Futility in Delaware Derivative Actions

Introduction written by Tanya Dmitronow and Julia Pizzi. Full analysis written by Sarah Gold and Richard Spinogatti. Although they often involve overlapping issues, shareholder derivative lawsuits are fundamentally different from securities class actions. While the object of a securities class action is to hold the company (and, perhaps, its directors and officers) liable for harming investors and … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Reinstates the European Community’s RICO Suit Against RJR Nabisco

On April 23, 2014, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit reinstated the action brought by the European Community and its 26 member states against RJR Nabisco and related entities (collectively, “RJR”) for allegedly laundering drug money through the exchange of discounted euros and cigarettes. In the long-running case European Community v. RJR … Continue Reading

So Much for Bright-Line Tests on Extraterritorial Reach of U.S. Securities Laws?

In its landmark 2010 decision in Morrison v. National Australia Bank, the Supreme Court articulated what seemed to be a bright-line test for determining the extent to which the U.S. securities laws apply to transactions with international elements. In so doing, the Court harshly rejected the fact-intensive “conduct/effects” tests propounded several decades ago by the … Continue Reading

Whistleblower Antiretaliation Provision Does Not Apply Outside the U.S.

The Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ruled today that the Dodd-Frank Act’s prohibition on retaliation against whistleblowers does not apply extraterritorially. In affirming the dismissal of the case on extraterritoriality grounds, the court declined in Liu v. Siemens AG to address another issue that has attracted attention: whether a person qualifies as a … Continue Reading

Presumption of Reliance Survives in Securities Cases, But Defendants Can Dispute Price Impact at Class Certification

The U.S. Supreme Court today declined to abandon the efficient-market theory, with its rebuttable presumption of reliance that enables securities class actions to proceed without proof of actual reliance on alleged misrepresentations or omissions. However, the Court’s ruling in Halliburton Co. v. Erica P. John Fund, Inc. allows defendants to try to show at the … Continue Reading

Kahn v. M&F Worldwide Corp.: Delaware Supreme Court Affirms Court of Chancery Ruling that Business Judgment Review Can Apply to Squeeze-Out Mergers

In Kahn v. M&F Worldwide Corp., the Delaware Supreme Court unanimously affirmed the Court of Chancery’s decision that the business judgment standard, rather than the entire fairness standard of review, applies to controller freeze-out mergers where the controller’s proposal is conditioned at the outset on both Special Committee approval and a favorable majority of the … Continue Reading
LexBlog

This website uses third party cookies, over which we have no control. To deactivate the use of third party advertising cookies, you should alter the settings in your browser.

OK