Corporate Defense and Disputes

Important developments in U.S. securities law, white collar criminal defense, regulatory enforcement and other emerging issues impacting financial services institutions, publicly traded companies and private investment funds

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Mee (Rina) Kim

M. Rina Kim is an associate in the Litigation Department and is admitted to the New York bar. Her practice focuses on securities litigation, including class actions and shareholder derivative suits. She counsels clients regarding financial statement disclosures and represents companies in connection with government investigations and civil litigation relating to the antifraud provisions of the United States federal securities laws.

Rina is a 2015 graduate of The George Washington University Law School, where she was editor-in-chief of The George Washington International Law Review. She also served as president of The George Washington Graduate Korean Students Association. She was a Proskauer summer associate in 2014 and interned at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in the Division of Enforcement and the U.S. Department of Justice in the Criminal Division, Fraud Section.

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July 2021 Update of the SEC’s Covered Actions for Potential Whistleblower Claims

On July 30, 2021, the SEC posted 14 Notices of Covered Actions, after which individuals have 90 calendar days to apply for a whistleblower award.  As discussed in our prior post, the SEC publishes these Notices for cases in which the final judgment or order, either by itself or together with other prior judgments or … Continue Reading

Smooth Sailing: Another Securities Class Action Against a Cruise Line Dismissed

On May 27, 2021, the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida dismissed a securities class action against Carnival Corp. (“Carnival”), which operates the world’s largest cruise company, relating to the company’s health and safety disclosures made prior to and as the COVID-19 pandemic spread.  This decision follows a dismissal of another … Continue Reading

Review of the SEC Whistleblower Program: At the Crossroads of Securities Law and Whistleblower Protection

Fiscal year 2020 marked the ten-year anniversary of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act establishing the Securities and Exchange Commission’s whistleblower program. Since its inception through the end of FY2020, the SEC has awarded approximately $562 million to 106 individuals. Even a decade after it was created, the whistleblower program continues to … Continue Reading

Failure to Cruise Past the Pleading Requirements in the Norwegian Cruise Lines Securities Class Action

On April 10, 2021, the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida dismissed a securities class action complaint against Norwegian Cruise Lines (“NCL”) relating to the company’s disclosures made as the coronavirus pandemic was starting to unfold in the United States. In Douglas v. Norwegian Cruise Lines, et al., the court found … Continue Reading

Stumbling Through Securities Law Challenges for COVID-19 Vaccine Developers

As the world waits to overcome the COVID-19 pandemic, publicly traded pharmaceutical companies waging in that fight are facing the multifaceted challenge of developing COVID-19 responses, informing the public of their progress, and managing legal challenges related to their efforts. Enter AstraZeneca. AstraZeneca partnered with Oxford University to develop a COVID-19 vaccine in April 2020, … Continue Reading

Cakes Gone Bad: The Cheesecake Factory Faces Securities Scrutiny

COVID-related securities claims continue to rattle the marketplace. On December 7, a leading plaintiffs firm announced an investigation on behalf of shareholders of The Cheesecake Factory Inc., just days after the SEC announced it was settling charges against the company for making misleading disclosures about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on its business operations … Continue Reading

International Comity and Deference: A Foreign Government with Final Say When Interpreting its Own Laws

On Tuesday, the Second Circuit in In Re Vitamin C Antitrust Litigation vacated a $147 million award against two Chinese companies for engaging in anti-competitive behavior.  At issue was how a federal court should respond when a foreign government’s regulatory scheme conflicts with U.S. laws.  Because the Chinese companies could not simultaneously comply with Chinese law … Continue Reading
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